HIRTaylor Mac’s dark comedy is the story of a 21st century prodigal son. A veteran with PTSD responds to his father’s stroke by coming home to help care for him, but finds himself in the aftermath of another regime overthrow. His mother (formerly a battered wife) and his newly transitioned transgender sibling are finally thriving in the household that used to be ruled by dad. HIR (a gender pronoun pronounced “here”) is a metaphor for both gender and place, and the play will have audiences crying in laughter and sympathy as they attempt to discover if we can all adapt to live here, now.

“Mac […] isn’t so much remaking the world in his own image as he is addressing subjects that remain, remarkably, underplayed on the American stage: what bodies mean and what stories women are allowed to tell or perform.” – The New Yorker

“A crackling production of a remarkable, audacious, uproarious black comedy with a daring combination of realism and madcap absurdity.” – Charles Isherwood, The New York Times

Starring:

Christine Lanning
Grant Brittan
Matthew Zodrow
Dakota Lee Bryant
Directed by Kory Kight-Pagala

Shows 
May – 4th/5th/6th

House Opens at 7:30pm
Show starts at 8:00pm

Tickets are available at
OKC Civic Center Website
or call the Civic Center at 405-297-2264
Tickets $25

Killer Joe

Tracy Letts, Pulitzer Prize winning playwright and native Oklahoman, began his career with Killer Joe. Set in a trailer park just outside of Dallas, the story pits a struggling family against the titular character—a detective who moonlights as a hit man.  Shockingly violent, darkly humorous, and uncomfortably relatable, Killer Joe forces audiences into a world of moral ambiguity and the lengths people go when they hit rock bottom.  Note: this play is for mature audiences only. The film, based on the script, was given an NC-17 rating for graphic, disturbing content involving violence and sexuality, and a scene of brutality.

“…a portrait of a purely American world that is so numbed out that carnage fits comfortably into the everyday domestic landscape.” – the New York Times

“… Killer Joe revels in its white trash stereotypes, and gives you permission to do the same; it’s pulp fiction which has it both ways, deriving humor from dirty realism. It’s slick, it’s well constructed, it knows exactly where it’s going.” – New York Daily News

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Beyond the Stratosphere

This play, from Oklahoma City playwright La’Charles Purvey, is a gritty snapshot of the effects of HIV and AIDS on a group where the topic of “the disease” is still considered taboo. The story introduces five black men from different walks of life who embody different aspects of a traditionally marginalized people trying to find meaning before they are consumed.  Their Christmas party, and ours, celebrates courage, generosity, grace, survival, and hope.

OKCTC Blood BoundaryNative American New Play Festival

This season will be the 8th annual Native American New Play Festival; our region’s only professionally produced theatre festival celebrating Native American writing and performance. The two-weekend festival, sponsored in part by the Oklahoma Arts Council, will include playwriting workshops, family events, musical performances, and panel discussions that nurture and share the work of Native Artists.

Bboundary-1lood Boundary

At the center of this season’s 8th annual Native American New Play Festival will be the fully staged production of Vicki Lynn Mooney’s official winning play of the 2016 Native American New Play Festival Blood Boundary, set in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1920 and inspired by Mooney’s family stories.  This play is the third in her trilogy “Broken Heart Land.”

“A young man raised in a white family has to rethink his life when confronted with his Cherokee mixed-blood relatives and chooses to stand with them in a time of racial oppression during the dark days of 1920 leading up to the Greenwood Massacre in 1921.”  Vicki Lynn Mooney

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HIR

Taylor Mac’s dark comedy is the story of a 21st century prodigal son. A veteran with PTSD responds to his father’s stroke by coming home to help care for him, but finds himself in the aftermath of another regime overthrow. His mother (formerly a battered wife) and his newly transitioned transgender sibling are finally thriving in the household that used to be ruled by dad. HIR (a gender pronoun pronounced “here”) is a metaphor for both gender and place, and the play will have audiences crying in laughter and sympathy as they attempt to discover if we can all adapt to live here, now.

“Mac […] isn’t so much remaking the world in his own image as he is addressing subjects that remain, remarkably, underplayed on the American stage: what bodies mean and what stories women are allowed to tell or perform.” – The New Yorker

“A crackling production of a remarkable, audacious, uproarious black comedy with a daring combination of realism and madcap absurdity.” – Charles Isherwood, The New York Times

toxic-1

The Toxic Avenger

Based on the cult classic film of the same name, The Toxic Avenger is a campy yet topical musical that explores pollution and the monsters (or heroes) it creates. Joe DiPietro wrote the book of the musical, Bon Jovi keyboardist David Bryan wrote the music, and together they wrote the lyrics.  The Toxic Avenger is an unconventional musical about an environmental scientist who sets out to save New Jersey from the toxic waste that is filling the city, but in the process mutates into Toxie, “the super hero that New Jersey needs!” Reviewers agree that this is the musical for B-film lovers, and great fun for those “in the know and in the mood.”